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Jul 08, Jenessa Gayheart rated a book really liked it. Geek Love by Katherine Dunn.

Jul 07, May 16, Now he knew better; if the book never opens up and comes out, it can be warped to fit the image others see. No, a book wasn't invulnerable to the appearance of its cover, not by any means. Search for a book to add a reference. We take abuse seriously in our discussion boards. Only flag comments that clearly need our attention.

On Being a Modern Bard

As a general rule we do not censor any content on the site. The only content we will consider removing is spam, slanderous attacks on other members, or extremely offensive content eg. We will not remove any content for bad language alone, or being critical of a particular book. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. The Story of Eidolon 3. Rate this book Clear rating 1 of 5 stars 2 of 5 stars 3 of 5 stars 4 of 5 stars 5 of 5 stars.

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Journey to the Past: Journey to the Past 0. Trees of Change 0.

Jenessa Gayheart (Author of Aberrant Literature Short Fiction Collection Volume I)

I have never read any Haruki Murakami before. I was lost in the muddy bog of it. Nope, not gonna tell you.


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  • Eidolon: The Thousand Years Ghost by Jenessa Grimm Gayheart.
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Gotta read it to find it. An interesting trait of this book is that there are no names of any characters. Not even the main character who tells the stories. But also, rather than names, everyone has a title: The Librarian, the Gatekeeper, the Grandfather. And yet, the things they ordered at the Italian restaurant were all meticulously listed in Italian, and the description of eating food throughout is a minor focus. Musical artists, books, songs, all are listed like pointless name-dropping.

In all, I will likely keep images in my head of things described in this book for many weeks. Seems peaceful, but would it be satisfactory? This mixture of familiar and surreal creates a neat nestling of fluffy cupcakes of magic in a solid baking-pan of reality. There is some magical psychological reference to the mind and the quality of person one can be with or without the mind, the quality of life one can live by using it or not using it. The first half of the book caused my brain to have to think of how others think, which is the adventure I typically look forward to.

Why the boy in the story made the choices he did, how he was raised by his zookeeper father, etc. Like any other story about a person in another country or another family situation. I found myself saying the usual things in my head: A normal and thought-provoking story that I could easily slide my own opinions into. For half the book. The protagonist and his father act in their belief that the benefits likely outweigh the dangers, though they seem hesitant to upset the status quo.

Along the way are some ambiguously supernatural elements that add to the mystery all that came before. This story is clearly an introductory tale, the author hinting at a larger world and many secrets awaiting discovery. Already, Grimm's sequel, Eidolon: Trees of Change, is available for Kindle, print soon to follow. A book geared toward teens, most of the tale is from a young person's perspective, the downside of that being that some of the more interesting events enacted by adult characters are presented second-hand or from a distance.

Hopefully, the young people will take a more prominent role in the central action of the subsequent story line. Apr 10, Jake Jarvi rated it really liked it. A really great YA novel that has good-hearted characters at it's center who not only keep us involved in their adventure, but serve as great examples of fully engaging with your community and those around you. I had a hard time at first because so many people are introduced at that first meeting and I couldn't keep everyone straight.

Once it started following Hickory and getting into his and his dad's relationship with Before, it was really great. I couldn't wait to find out more about the Eidol A really great YA novel that has good-hearted characters at it's center who not only keep us involved in their adventure, but serve as great examples of fully engaging with your community and those around you. I couldn't wait to find out more about the Eidolon and what influence she would have on the unfolding of events.

I loved Hickory and Abacus and Quantum. I thought the building excitement about the Before was really great. Really fantastic relationships and personal moments. All of the relationships between the characters and the way they interacted was really great. The only thing is that if someone didn't know this was the first book of a trilogy, they'd think the ending came out of nowhere. It felt very abrupt and didn't resolve any of the story lines. It feels like the end of a chapter instead of the end of the book.

Since I already have books two and three, it's like--No worries, crack open the next one. But if I thought it was a stand alone book, I'd be like--What? On to book two! Apr 27, Kerry rated it really liked it Shelves: This story was an interesting take on a post-apocalyptic world. It left more questions than answers, however I thoroughly enjoyed the character development and personalities of the main characters, Hickory and Abacus.

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Using modem-day object names as people names, by the way, was very creative! It gave the sense that this community was indeed years away from our current age. I had two issues with this book that kept it from being a 5-star story. First, I wished the overall plot had advanced This story was an interesting take on a post-apocalyptic world. First, I wished the overall plot had advanced at a faster pace and ended with a stronger cliffhanger.

Secondly, I wish this book had a better exterior cover that hinted at the plot. The current cover appears to be the wrong size and only indirectly represents the story line.

Eidolon: The Thousand Years Ghost

I will be looking for the next book in the series. This book piqued my curiosity! May 08, Dee rated it liked it Recommends it for: On the whole, I enjoyed this book, but all the council meetings got rather tedious. I realize they were employed to show the egalitarian nature of the society, but they just began to get on my nerves. This novel showed that religious extremism will exist, no matter what book is followed, the Bible or an historical journal. I'm a sucker for rooting-around-lost-civilizations stories, which is what enticed me to try it out. I liked the characters and the unique world-building.

I look forward to reading more in this series. The fourth is a suspicion that no matter how much ancient bards tried to remove themselves from the telling and surrender to the Muse , they must have brought something of their own existence to their tellings and must have had to address and integrate many of the same variables with which I as a modern performer must deal.

I made the decision very early in presenting my Odyssey that I would always lead a question-and-answer session following my musical performance.

It came about initially as a way to market myself to schools and accentuate the educational component of my songs, but it has turned into an aspect I see as essential as the performance itself. My discussions have allowed me to observe that variables in the age, gender, and the educational makeup of the audience result in my songs evoking variable meanings and themes, some contradictory.

Younger audiences identify with Telemachus. That brings me to how performer and performance place are related.

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My modern considerations pale in comparison to those of the ancient bards, which we know from Homer might have included drunk antagonistic audiences, smoke from fires, and loose dogs to name a few. But I have learned to embrace the differences in how my piece plays in wide variety of performance spaces, from living rooms to outdoor amphitheaters. Recognizing the strengths and weaknesses of various spaces has led me to perform my Odyssey differently utilizing the tools of improvisation I mentioned above.

This in turn gives me insight into the phenomenon of local variation, which was also observed by Parry and Lord in a vastly different context. From my experience performing The Odyssey , I would expand Mr. A story about a journey home has lead me back to what originally fascinated me about the classics: The stories Homer told and the mode in which he told them still move people today and are as relevant as they were years ago: I see and hear it in each and every performance. The guiding principles and features of oral tradition are still powerful, meaningful, and accurate.

My Odyssey has also helped me answer the very questions I pose in my Invocation.

I am a traveling bard and my role is to move audiences with stories told in song. As David Byrne himself once sang: