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Television makes its historic debut in Part I: It is the very day her father Sam has bought their first TV. The table is already set, when Sam proudly wheels the antennaed TV into the dining room: Now we can watch Jackie Gleason while we eat! From the late 40s to , TV prices dropped by half, and rates of TV ownership rose to two-thirds of all American homes. That rate would jump to 90 percent by The Baines home also suggests the changing place of television: The earliest televisions were built to resemble wooden furniture, but they became increasingly modern and portable beginning in the mids.

The problem, as critics in both and understood it, was not television itself, but television without limits. When Marty Junior gets home, he crashes in front of the flatscreen TV—watching six channels at once, barely looking up when his father gets home: TV screens are embedded in nearly every wall of the future McFly family home. Fox wear headsets—Marlene to talk on the phone, but Marty Jr. Marty has to go to the McFly family farm of to find a household free of television, the fireplace blazing behind the dinner table.

That passivity is also distinctly classed. His brother and sister, nearly erased from existence, are dressed in business-wear, eating breakfast, just before their mother and father arrive home from tennis. The TV is nowhere to be seen. Subscribe or Give a Gift. Who is the New Jamestown Skeleton?

The focus on the creation of the first film was perfect. Besides from the incident with the hoverboard stunt, and Cripsin Glover's replacement, that was all there really was for Part II. I can't believe that there was so little to tell from Part III. What about Michael J. Fox accidentally getting hung? I will warn you that Michael J Fox, Tom Wilson, and Mary Steenburgen obviously Crispin Glover, too were not interviewed and things detailing to their character or incidents involving them was pulled from various sources over the year.

Back to the Future Trilogy Limited Edition Collector's Tin (MIKIEDGE)

Do get this book. I sound like I'm marking it down for those two reasons, but it was really well done. I read it all in one sitting and I enjoyed it immensely. I just wish there was more, and maybe there could have been if the actors that weren't interviewed were. A really interesting book that made me want to rewatch the trilogy again.

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I haven't been all that diligent in reading BTTF tidbits, so most of the information was new to me. One thing I did know was the original casting of Eric Stoltz; even then, though, I still learned a lot more about why they replaced him and how that impacted other aspects of the production. I would have loved it if the book were even longer, and covered some other aspects of the movie.

Although the soundtrack is mentioned, I A really interesting book that made me want to rewatch the trilogy again. Although the soundtrack is mentioned, I would have loved to read more about Silvestri's score.

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The Future of Our Past

In case you're wondering, here are the major topics in the book as I remember them: Too bad we don't have hoverboards yet. I read this book in part to celebrate "Back to the Future Day," October 21, the date that Marty McFly and Doc Brown took the flying DeLorean time machine to the future to "do something about" Marty's future kids, as it was put at the end of the first "Back to the Future" movie. The first movie was never intended to be the start of a trilogy, but its phenomenal success made the sequels almost mandatory. The first screenplays are textbook examples of writing, and the movies were directed and performed to perfection.

This book, a behind-the-scenes look at everything that the movies accomplished, the trials they overcame, and the impact that they have had on culture—not just in the United States, but worldwide for generations of fans. For any die-hard fan of the BTTF series, this should be a must-read.

Jul 06, Brandon Forsyth rated it liked it. A fun, if slight, look at everything to do with 'Back to the Future'. I love the films and have heard a lot of these stories before, so it is to Gaines' credit that I did learn a thing or two. There's no great insight into the people, system or culture that produced these films, A fun, if slight, look at everything to do with 'Back to the Future'.

There's no great insight into the people, system or culture that produced these films, and it's easy to see why - this has all the earmarks of being rushed out to coincide with the original film's 30th anniversary. Not getting Michael J. Fox's participation hurts, and Gaines is upfront that he only had a half hour with Bob Zemeckis. It's impressive what this book manages to accomplish, considering its limitations, but I'm still left wanting more.

God, do I want to watch the movies though! Apr 28, Matt rated it really liked it Shelves: Gaines developed the backstory of how the film got into production before the issue of miscasting of Eric Stoltz as lead character Marty McFly and how director Robert Zemeckis and writer Bob Gale handled the situation to get Michael J.

Instantly Gaines had hooked the reader by showing the challenges the production team faced in getting the film to screen. Though interviews of numerous actors and crewmembers, Gaines gives a detailed account of how iconic scenes were created and how much people enjoyed the making the films. I was looking forward to this book but came away mostly disappointed.

I was thinking this was going to be akin to Rinzler's The Making of Star Wars books, full of details culled from production notes, script drafts, storyboards, and interviews, but while there's some of that, it's nowhere near as extensive. While Gaines managed to get most of the major behind-the-scenes players to talk with him, including Robert Zemeckis though Gaines admits in his introduction he only got a half hour to interv I was looking forward to this book but came away mostly disappointed.

While Gaines managed to get most of the major behind-the-scenes players to talk with him, including Robert Zemeckis though Gaines admits in his introduction he only got a half hour to interview him , the cast was less willing to talk, with Lea Thompson and Christopher Lloyd being the only major players sat down with him. On most subjects you'll learn little more than you'd get from the audio commentaries and featurettes on the home video releases. The notable exceptions are the dirty laundry behind the production -- Eric Stoltz getting fired, the decision to replace Crispin Glover in the sequels and the subsequent lawsuit, and the accident that nearly killed a stunt woman -- which Universal understandably avoids in official material.

That alone makes the book worth reading, even if you have to wade through material you're already familiar with. This is a short, breezy book, so the rehashing isn't too bad. Because the novel was based upon the draft of the screenplay used for Eric Stoltz, there are lots of fascinating differences, from an alternate opening sequence where Marty acts like a John Hughes character, to Marty treating his family with utter contempt in the original Aug 12, Mark rated it really liked it Shelves: This takes a relatively thorough look at the behind-the-scenes of the Back To The Future Trilogy and proves to be an interesting read, if a little dry at times.

Ni This takes a relatively thorough look at the behind-the-scenes of the Back To The Future Trilogy and proves to be an interesting read, if a little dry at times. But the second and especially third really feel short changed and there are plenty of places were Gaines could have dug a little deeper.

The interviewees are interesting especially Dean Cundey, the director of photography and Lea Thompson, who played Lorraine - apparently named because the studio head, Sid Sheinberg, wanted the character to share his wifes name but some of those not interviewed as mentioned above are noticeable by their absence, chiefly Michael J. Fox, Mary Steenburgen and Tom Wilson. I vaguely knew that Eric Stoltz had been cast as Marty because of scheduling conflicts with Michael J.

Fox, but this book will tell you the whole story.

We Don't Need Roads: The Making of the Back to the Future Trilogy by Caseen Gaines

If you like movie trivia and you didn't know that Mattel actually sold hoverboards prop replica hoverboards that people still expected to work , you should check out this book. Inside you'll find behind the scenes info on all three movies I never knew the sequels weren't planned! I'm really going to have a Back to the Future rewatch party--who wants to join? I can regale you with factoids about the series, or you can enjoy the book on your own. Look, I'm not going to mince words here. It's the literary equivalent of the Back to the Future movies: If you, like me, saw the first Back to the Future movie as a teenager and fell in love with its charming cast and story, Look, I'm not going to mince words here.

If you, like me, saw the first Back to the Future movie as a teenager and fell in love with its charming cast and story, this book is for you. It's an inside perspective on all three movies, and while the author is clearly a fellow fan, it's not fawning or obsequious.

There are interviews with cast members the only major player missing is Michael J. Fox, who comes across as genuinely likable even while absent and crew, stories I'd never heard, and an overview of how fans have reacted to the movie over the last 30 years. I was never nuts about the 2nd movie, but who cares? I was seat-belted into the DeLorean and approaching 88 miles an hour and having a great time. Aug 07, Aarann rated it really liked it Shelves: This was a road trip listen and a good one. About half of the book seemed to be about the making of the first film, and all of the ups and downs associated with that, and the second and third films followed.

There were a lot of details I'd never known about the stunt woman nearly dying in Part II, the reasons for the Jennifer recast, and the fact that Parts II and III were unofficially subtitled "Paradox" and I was surprised by how interesting it all was. All in all, a great road trip listen.


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Oct 13, Moa rated it it was amazing. For someone who's both interested in filmmaking and a fan of Back to the Future this was gold!! A good structure, interesting facts etc! I would recommend you to listen to the audiobook since the narrator is awesome! I do believe though that you have to have seen all three movies and know some names of the actors to fully appreciate this.


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  • Jul 07, Ian rated it really liked it. A short, but interesting, read. The glimpses into the early creations of the series are fascinating, but relatively little focus is given to the later two movies Part 2 doesn't come up until more than halfway through the book. Oct 02, William Bevill rated it it was amazing Shelves: Once this book hits 88 pages per hour I thoroughly enjoyed this read.

    I was about 10 when I saw "Back to the Future" for the first time and like many it has been a lifelong impact. I profess to not being quite obsessed about it to the point of knowing every detail about the film so it was with this that I pleasantly dived into the book to learn a few things, but wound up reading it cover to cover. I learned a lot not just about this franchise but the stars and crew behind it, and Once this book hits 88 pages per hour I learned a lot not just about this franchise but the stars and crew behind it, and best of it all it has made me once again want to watch all the films in order.

    It's fun and light reading, but if you are a diehard this may not be new information to you based on the other reviews I read but I loved the book. Feb 17, J. Singleton rated it liked it. Much of it seems culled from movie trivia sites. I have done the same, but this was a major publication, and not one of my independently published tomes. Truly original content is minimum. The reader gets a thorough recounting of the development and the original process of shooting with Eric Schultz.

    Back to the Future has the dubious distinction of being mostly reshot with a new actor. The old one wasn't working out. The dedicated Schultz would also not perform a stage punch on Tom Wilson Much of it seems culled from movie trivia sites. The dedicated Schultz would also not perform a stage punch on Tom Wilson--rather resorting to real strikes--which was cruel and unprofessional. The replacement of Eric Schultz with Michael J.

    Fox most definitely saved the movie and turned it into the s cinema touchstone that it is. And there's the mystery of Crispin Glover. This drama ends up being the most interesting part of this book. That Glover was, at the time, the most successful actor on set was intriguing. Stories of his weirdness makes him one of the most well-sketched character in this book. His performance skills were unquestionable; his personal skills were controversial. This is followed by his replacement with struggling actor and Glover-replacement Jeffrey Weisman, who has the misfortune of becoming collateral damage in the fight between the rich and the very rich.

    Future Threat

    The author tries to be fair and balanced, but he also clearly comes down on the Bobs' side: Glover asked for too much money, and he got cut. The trilogy was life and career changing for all of the leads, for better and worse. It led to Glover being partially blacklisted and Wilson being typecast. There's an excellent recounting of all the things that the series got right about the future--which is now the past--and all the things that it got wrong.

    Wish they'd done more to warn us about Biff becoming our President, though. Much attention is focused on hoverboards. The inspiration for hoverboards. The attempts to build hoverboards. Mattel's shameful knock-offs for hoverboard fans. The horrible injuries caused by hoverboards. I wish we had hoverboards in , and not just two-wheeled douche machines that catch fire.