Download e-book Katniss the Cattail: An Unauthorized Guide to Names and Symbols in Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Katniss the Cattail: An Unauthorized Guide to Names and Symbols in Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Katniss the Cattail: An Unauthorized Guide to Names and Symbols in Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games book. Happy reading Katniss the Cattail: An Unauthorized Guide to Names and Symbols in Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Katniss the Cattail: An Unauthorized Guide to Names and Symbols in Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Katniss the Cattail: An Unauthorized Guide to Names and Symbols in Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games Pocket Guide.

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Katniss the Cattail , please sign up. Lists with This Book. I was a little disgruntled by the quick wrap up in Mockingjay.


  • Flower-Fruit-and-Thorn-Pieces (Blumen-Frucht-und-Dornstücke), op. 82 - No. 2. Furiosa.
  • Customers Also Bought?
  • Slain.
  • Friction: How Radicalization Happens to Them and Us.
  • .

But now, after reading Katniss the Cattail by Valerie E. Frankel, I realize how brilliant Suzanne Collins really is. The answer is simple. This book explains the symbolism throughout the series. There is no challenging that; but did you realize that almost every name in this book has some link back to Roman civilization? More importantly, to the overthrowing of Caesar? I devoured this book the moment I opened my mailbox. It makes me want to reread the series with a more critical eye so I can appreciate the literary genius that is named Suzanne Collins.

See a Problem?

I do hope the movies can pull off this subtle characterization. Knowing the history behind the names really brings a new depth to the characters. Wondering about what you might find in Katniss the Cattail? Here is a small sampling of some of the information I found so captivating: But then I read the books, and I thought: Obviously this is a dystopian read, but there is more to it. George Orwell is the author of one of my favorite books, Animal Farm. As the plot of Mockingjay develops, I knew the leaders were important.

The events that followed were not by chance. Here is the true danger of power… The lesson in both series is clear: Now be honest, when you read Mockingjay, were you thinking about Animal Farm? Seems like I should listen more closely to the ramblings of a middle aged man. Apparently, Collins has explained in interviews that the Hunger Games themselves were inspired by the story of Theseus. As the story goes, every nine years, seven Athenian boys and seven Athenian girls would be sent to Crete as Tribute for the Minotaur to devour.

Theseus volunteered to be placed with the Tributes, and killed the Minotaur Frankel Does the plot sound familiar? Katniss the Cattail is divided into three sections: The names of Panem, symbols, and literary allusions.


  • Crónicas de Autocarro (1) (Portuguese Edition).
  • Inscrivez-vous sur Kobo et commencez la lecture numérique dès aujourd'hui.
  • The Circular 230 Deskbook (March 2017 Edition) (Practising Law Institute Tax Law and Estate Planning Library).
  • Zephaniah Kingsley Jr. and the Atlantic World: Slave Trader, Plantation Owner, Emancipator.

The symbols were pretty straight forward, but the allusions and historical value of the names were insightful. The author has done a fabulous job of putting together the research. When a great work of fiction presents itself, it only makes sense to view it under a critical literary lens.

I know The Hunger Games is being taught in classrooms across the country because I have friends that are teaching the book to their students. At first I worried that it would be too graphic or gory for the censorship hounds, but after reading about the plethora of literary devices used in the novels, it only makes sense to teach these books. You can also find her on her website http: Feb 29, Sarah's Reviews rated it it was amazing Shelves: Full of thought provoking observations, Katniss the Cattail is a quick, clean read for any fan of The Hunger Games trilogy.

It provides the historical and scientific background of the names of people, places, and symbols in the series as well as their links to other well know literature Plato, Shakespeare, etc Frankel also provides some very interesting and convincing speculations as to the relationship between the names and the messages of the story itself. Readers who have not read the en Full of thought provoking observations, Katniss the Cattail is a quick, clean read for any fan of The Hunger Games trilogy.

Readers who have not read the entire series should be aware that this book contains spoilers as it is analyzing the series as a whole. Read more content based reviews at Sarah's Reviews: Apr 08, Michelle rated it really liked it Shelves: If you are a die hard fan of the Hunger Games series like me and enjoy reading any extra knowledge on the characters just to feel more connected to the story then you will enjoy this book.

Katniss the Cattail goes into depth explaining the history and meaning behind each character from all three of the books within the series. It also mentions why some of the symbols used within the series hold such meaning and importance to the characters. The author really did her homework on researching the histories behind the names that Suzanne Collins made come to life. They all have that are either defined in history, by nature, in representation of their district, or even influenced by other literary characters.

No matter where they came from they all hold an important meaning in the Hunger Games. This author defiantly spent her time researching all the possible meanings behind these names and symbols. It is clearly shown within the long in depth descriptions of the main characters names. Mar 07, Paula Phillips rated it it was amazing.

Are you a Hunger Games fan? Holding the edge of your seat as the Hunger Game movie's release dates comes closer and closer with only just over two weeks to go: I so cannot wait, I think for myself I have to explain my experience with the Hunger Games as I was introduced to them a few years ago with the release of the very first book "The Hunger Games" , I saw it coming and going from work and I thought hmmmm I'll have to read that, so I picked it up and found that no matter how hard I tri Are you a Hunger Games fan?

I'll have to read that, so I picked it up and found that no matter how hard I tried , I could not get into it at all -so that was that , I put it back with no intention on picking it up again. However, that was to be short-lived as I soon discovered that the book was too be made into film as I sat back at the movies and witnessed the trailer and OMG it looked so great , so I decided Ok, I'll give the book another go and guesss what readers I LOVED IT and soon I was hooked just like that on the Hunger Games and from that stemmed me wanting to read everything dystopian that I could get my hands on and then of course like I did with Twilight, read everything related to The Hunger Games trilogy which of course included Valerie's book "Katniss the Cattail" - this book is a non-fiction novel and is great to have as a reference guide to accompany the Hunger Games as Valerie has broken down the book and delved deeper into the meanings of the characters names e.

It also talked about all the symbols e. It was really amazing to discover the amount of detail that Suzanne Collins went to into deciding the characters for the book and after you read Valerie Frankel's Katniss The Cattail ,you will have such a deeper understanding and knowledge of The Hunger Games Trilogy. Mar 23, Cheryl Malandrinos rated it it was amazing. Katniss the Cattail provides fans of Suzanne Collins's series a detailed look into the names and symbols found in all three books: From Alma Coin to York, from bows and arrows to Snake, and a thorough discussion of Katniss, Peeta and Gale, this book provides historical and literary background information on everyone and everything you could imagine from the books.

Civil War admirals, Roman leaders, Persian kings and those made famous by Shakespeare's p Katniss the Cattail provides fans of Suzanne Collins's series a detailed look into the names and symbols found in all three books: Civil War admirals, Roman leaders, Persian kings and those made famous by Shakespeare's plays fill its pages. You'll soon discover the characters of Panem mean a lot more than their odd-sounding names. Frankel also provides information on "Allusions to Literature and Life," discussing dystopia, history, Greek and Roman mythology and reality TV.

The final pages of the book include a list of names by origin and the districts and their products. This is a superb book for any lover of The Hunger Games series. It would also be an excellent resource for writers, showing the importance of carefully considering the names of their characters. Be warned, however, this book contains many spoilers, so it's a good idea to finish the series before reading it.

Aug 04, James M. This "unauthorized guide" presents glosses on the names used in the Hunger Games series. There are etymologies of the nature names from the districts and histories of the Romans whose names characters from the Capitol held. The connections between the word histories and the stories are sometimes eye-opening even if sometimes a bit of a stretch. A quick but enjoyable read! Oct 12, Kelly rated it really liked it Shelves: Even the name of the country evokes images of ancient Rome: The book is divided into two sections: Frankel draws on a number of subjects to give greater context to the names and symbols of THG: Even those names with little apparent meaning Rory make the cut.

enter

Buy for others

As such, this section also makes a handy reference guide to the many characters who appear in the trilogy. Symbols and Allusions briefly touches upon a number of topics, many of which deserve a much lengthier discussion. An in-depth discussion of allusions is perhaps beyond the scope of such a book, and Frankel would have been better served to omit this section and instead focus more on names and symbols.

For as detailed as The Names of Panem is at times, some of the entries seem oddly incomplete. Take, for example, this brief paragraph about the morphlings: Used as a pain reliever and sedative, the drug was named after Morpheus, the Greek god of sleep and dreams. With both medicinal and recreational uses, it stands to reason that morphine or its Panem-day version is one of the drugs manufactured in District Six. Some Amazon reviewers have complained about the accuracy of the information, starting with the title: Katniss and Cattails are two entirely different plants.

For what it is — a short, relatively inexpensive guide — Katniss the Cattail is enjoyable enough. You can read it straight through or use it as a reference guide; at the very least, it provides a nice starting point for further research. Hardcore fans of which I am one!

After all, this is a woman who lost her entire family, possibly as retribution for something she did or failed to do; who survived The Hunger Games when 23 of her peers could not; who had to stand by and watch as someone she loved was sexually trafficked by President Snow; and who withstood torture possibly of a sexual nature during the Second Rebellion — and yet still managed to sustain the hope, courage, and optimism to bear a child in the midst of such suffering and carnage.

May 21, TC rated it liked it. Something of a typical literary critique, this book collects thoughts from other critics, interview with the original author, and general knowledge of literature and history to draw meanings from the names of characters in the book and the symbols found throughout bread, roses, etc.

It also draws parallels to both ancient civilizations and some issues of today, though some of those will already be obvious we of course understand that the Capitol was inspired by ancient Rome, for example. Howe Something of a typical literary critique, this book collects thoughts from other critics, interview with the original author, and general knowledge of literature and history to draw meanings from the names of characters in the book and the symbols found throughout bread, roses, etc. However, there is a lot of insight here when the author correlates character names in the book with those from history, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar , and in some cases, biology.

And the retelling of some myths is useful for those of us who never studied those in earnest--for example, who knew that throughout the history of storytelling, male heroes usually wield swords, but heroines always use range weapons--like, say, a bow and arrow? Or that silver is a symbol of "feminine strength? It's easy enough to interpret nearly anything as one wishes. What is interesting, though, is that a popular young adult fiction book has inspired such lofty discussion in the first place.

While there's no doubt Harold Bloom is wringing his hands even harder that normal on this latest evidence of the end of Western Civilization, those of us who appreciate The Hunger Games trilogy and their strange hold on us can also appreciate the work this author has done to put together this slim volume that provides additional food for thought. It's also a great way to help the series' younger readers begin to realize there often is more to a story than just what first appears.

Jan 17, Kait rated it it was ok. I'm confused as to why this book has so many sparkling reviews. As far as the world of companion books go, it's really amateur and half-hearted. Basically, this book is a long blog post, tiny photos with captions and an abundance of minor spelling errors included. I realize my blog suffers from the same issues, but then again, I'm not trying to sell that material to anyone.

A large portion of the analysis is taken from previously published, well-known Hunger Games companion authors, such as V. Arr I'm confused as to why this book has so many sparkling reviews. Arrow and John Granger. If you've read them, you've already read a lot of this.

Desert Survival Food: Cattails (Typha latifolia)

More than anything it's another look into the Roman culture and Shakespeare parallels. They're fascinating, but it doesn't really offer you anything new if you've picked up a Hunger Games companion book before. Not to say it's ALL old hat-- there are some new ideas and insights that I wasn't familiar with, just not as much as I'd hoped for. What frustrated me most about this book was that some characters were simply rattled off without any description, not even the basic meaning of their names. Others have minimal descriptions that barely cover a thing.

For instance, the author postulates that both Effie and Cecelia are named after martyred saints, but only Effie's description discusses the saint and how it relates back to her character while Cecelia gets about two sentences. I have nothing against self-published authors and I applaud the research that went into this, but it just didn't pan out well.

Mar 06, Ally rated it really liked it Shelves: From my blog, Word Vagabond: Supporting Independent and Small Press authors. English professor and pop-culture author Valerie Frankel delves into the symbolism, history, and mythology behind the popular Hunger Games series. The largest part of this book is an examination of the names of the significant characters in all three of the Hunger Games books, listed in alphabetical order. Following that, Frankel explains the meaning of the main symbols in the series and then examines its themes.

Please enter recipient e-mail address es.

Account Options

The E-mail Address es you entered is are not in a valid format. Please re-enter recipient e-mail address es. You may send this item to up to five recipients. The name field is required. Please enter your name.

Customers Also Bought

The E-mail message field is required. Please enter the message. Please verify that you are not a robot. Would you also like to submit a review for this item? You already recently rated this item. Your rating has been recorded. Write a review Rate this item: Preview this item Preview this item.

Valerie Estelle Frankel Publisher: Allow this favorite library to be seen by others Keep this favorite library private. Find a copy in the library Finding libraries that hold this item Handbooks and manuals Handbooks, manuals, etc Named Person: Valerie Estelle Frankel Find more information about: Reviews User-contributed reviews Add a review and share your thoughts with other readers.

Add a review and share your thoughts with other readers. View most popular tags as: Similar Items Related Subjects: Linked Data More info about Linked Data.