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Nominated for 1 Golden Globe.

Learn more More Like This. Watergate TV Mini-Series Four Days in November Under Siege TV Movie Michael Chiklis, Ray Sharkey, J. Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Richard Nixon Richard Kiley Fred Buzhardt David Ogden Stiers Haig Jr Ed Flanders Leonard Garment Theodore Bikel Henry Kissinger Graham Beckel Ron Ziegler James Sikking Elliot Richardson Richard Venture Gerald Ford Gregg Henry John Dean Ramon Bieri Julie Nixon Eisenhower Amanda Wyss Tricia Nixon Cox Diana Bellamy Rose Mary Woods Susan Brown Edit Storyline Based on the acclaimed book written by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, The Final Days chronicles president Richard Nixon's administration during his critical period after the Watergate break-in scandal, which ultimately led to Nixon's resignation from the office on August Edit Did You Know?

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Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Report this. I have vivid memories of my mother glued to the television screen during the Watergate hearings. Now, as an adult, reading this detailed a counting of Nixon's final months in office I am struck by the similarity between Nixon and Trump's personalities. This account bvb thing was riveting to read.

The perpetual state of limbo in which Nixon's loyal staffers existed is hard to fathom. The differentiation between the man and What a fascinating read.

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The Final Days | Book by Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein | Official Publisher Page | Simon & Schuster

The differentiation between the man and the office, as well as a President's sense of being a person who will be assessed by historians was quite powerful. I do not envy anybody who works for a boss who lies. I also finish reading this book thinking that it seems next to impossible to be in politics and to maintain one's integrity. Aug 03, Jessica rated it it was amazing. Even though you know what is coming, the events on the inside provide a fascinating look inside the last year of the Nixon administration.

The details even manage to invoke sympathy for some of the players I hadn't anticipated. In a sense this book operates like a sequel to the wonderful "All the President's Men," and it showcases the chaos that the investigations of people like Woodward, Bernstein, and Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox brought into the Nixon White House.

Yet, unlike Woodward and Bernstein's previous book, this one drops the veneer of the reporters' perspective and brings the reader into the innermost rooms of power in the last year of Nixon's reign.

The Final Days

It's quite a scene. The story of the Watergate scandal In a sense this book operates like a sequel to the wonderful "All the President's Men," and it showcases the chaos that the investigations of people like Woodward, Bernstein, and Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox brought into the Nixon White House. The story of the Watergate scandal and its unraveling is so complex and baroque that it seems impossible to tell it all, and even this huge tome has to narrow its focus.

The writers thus seem to rely heavily on a few key sources and their viewpoints, especially J. Fred Burzhardt, who for most of this period was the lead lawyer for the President's Watergate defense team. The book shows that almost a year before Nixon left office Burzhardt and some of Nixon's closet friends were telling him he should consider resigning. Others near the President gingerly broached the same subject, but stayed loyal when he refused. Alexander Haig, the former soldier and Nixon chief-of-staff, acted the solider's part and supported his commander to the bitter end, even as he admitted to one staffer that of course he thought Nixon was "guilty as hell.

After all, everything was blurrier at the time than it has appeared in retrospect. What exactly were the "high crimes and misdemeanors" the Constitution called impeachable offenses? Was merely knowing about a crime the cover-up of the Watergate burglary a high crime? Were Nixon's words on scratchy Oval Office tapes "orders" to break the law or mere speculations that any President engaged in? This distinction was especially hard in an administration where its top officers, such as Haig, told subordinates that it was their duty to ignore some of the President's more bizarre orders until he calmed down.

What this book highlights though is that the Watergate investigation was all about the tapes. Without Alexander Butterfield's revelation to the Senate Investigating Committee that the President recorded Oval Office discussions, Watergate would be remembered as little more than some odd coincidences and John Dean's, Nixon's former General Counsel's, strong denunciations of the administration's complicity. The tapes provided the real evidence against him, and once their existence was revealed much of the next year was taken up with battles over subpoenas on certain tapes, selective releases of tapes, transcripts of tapes, interpretations of tapes and so on.

Again and again, everyone around Nixon had to wonder why he didn't just burn them the second they might have turned into a liability. It was his own paranoia after all that led Nixon to record everything he said in the first place, and his own paranoia that led him to try to cover up a crime he wasn't initially involved in, yet it was a strange sense of invulnerability that caused him to ignore caution and to keep holding tapes that brought down his life and his legacy.

He was truly a Shakespearean figure, as many people have pointed out. This book brings those Shakespearean and Nixonian characteristics, especially his hubris and neuroses, to the fore. It admittedly indulges too much in the day to day struggle over tapes and scheduling, but for the vision of a man crumbling after reaching the very summit of power, this book is unparalleled. Jun 19, Mandie Ditchburn rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. The Watergate scandal has always interested me, partly because of my background in journalism, but mostly because Woodward and Bernstein's books tell a fantastic detective story, one that's all the more compelling because it is true. If it had been a Hollywood screenplay, the plot would have been written off as implausible -- and with good reason.

The Final Days: The Last, Desperate Abuses of Power by the Clinton White House

While All The President's Men chronicled the two Washington Post reporters' search for the story behind the break-in at Democratic national headq The Watergate scandal has always interested me, partly because of my background in journalism, but mostly because Woodward and Bernstein's books tell a fantastic detective story, one that's all the more compelling because it is true. While All The President's Men chronicled the two Washington Post reporters' search for the story behind the break-in at Democratic national headquarters, its sequel, The Final Days , focuses on the resulting implosion of the Richard Nixon administration during Meticulously researched and detailed, the book tells the story of all the stakeholders -- from the President and his family to White House staff, the Senate and House to the lawyers on both sides of the courtroom.

It's undoubtedly a page-turner but the story is often agonising -- the tension and claustrophobia of the last few weeks of Nixon's presidency is palpable -- and the amount of detail can seem daunting, particularly in the first half of the book, which acts as a backgrounder before the day-by-day breakdown of events in the latter half. However, this detail adds a real sense of depth to the story. Important, often polarising figures such as Henry Kissinger, Alexander Haig and Nixon himself appear not as stereotypes or shallow portraits, but as real, often flawed, human beings. The Final Days is a tragedy of ancient Greek proportions, both intensely personal and horribly public.

While it may seem hard to get into initially the opening chapters are bogged down with background information , it's worth persevering with. The brisk journalistic style adds a sense of immediacy to a story that's more than 30 years old, and the characters are so well drawn that the reader feels an intimate knowledge and understanding of them. If there's an enigma in the book, it's Nixon himself. The president comes across as a victim of his own poor decisions and inability to acknowledge the consequences of his actions.


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Without these scenes, which include a drunk Nixon talking to portraits of past presidents, the book would lose much of its colour and therefore its humanity. And this is a very human story. It's a story of mistakes, lies and cover-ups, of guilt and cowardice, of strength and passion, dedication and belief. It's a story of a man who scrapped his way to the top but couldn't quite stay there.

Paradoxically, the ending itself doesn't matter; we all know Nixon resigns, waving his V-signs in the air without a trace of irony, and Ford takes over. But it's the journey that matters in The Final Days , rather than the destination. It's an intimate look at this most reserved, most isolated of presidents at his lowest ebb. Jun 24, Greg rated it it was amazing. Different, for obvious reasons, in scope to All The President's Men, but no less engaging.

What makes this stand out even more is that over 40 years later, we have the ability to disengage and take into account Nixon's later years in their entirety, but this book put together in less than two years after the resignation. Yet, even though events were still so raw, Woodward and Bernstein have managed to elicit some sympathy for a truly complex individual.

That, in itself, sh Truly remarkable book. That, in itself, should speak to the fair mindedness of the book. Nixon, for all his many, many faults, did achieve some great things and while I'm not into making predictions, I'm fairly sure he'll be treated much more kindly by history than the incumbent.


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Apr 30, Patrick rated it it was amazing Shelves: This 5 star rating is for me, I don't think most of my Goodreads friends would enjoy this. It is fascinating, illuminating, and depressing at the same time. It is the sequel to All the President's Men , and continues the story from the admissions at the end of that book until Nixon resigns. This book is different, and simultaneously more and less engaging. The first book details the search of the reporters for the facts to solve the mysteries of the circumstances as well as their discoveries.

Th This 5 star rating is for me, I don't think most of my Goodreads friends would enjoy this. That search and the walls they hit in searching for the truth are fascinating. For this book, many, many of the figures involved in Watergate agreed to be interviewed anonymously in order to get their side of the story out. The authors say nothing about themselves, and instead detail the final days of Nixon's presidency from a 3rd person, nearly omniscient point-of-view, using the actual words and thoughts provided by many of the principal characters, including family members, White House employees, Nixon staff members, other politicians and journalists--seriously everyone and their dog.

I missed the details of the search as in the previous book, but this format showed off the absolutely crazy, amazing amount of depth and information they were able to obtain. The strength is also a weakness as I see many other people have commented that they didn't like the massive amount of details. This is not for everyone. Better to read the summary than the whole thing. For me, it was fascinating and sad. The basic corrupting influence of power and politics was confirmed.

Truth and right were not the objectives of most figures in the story. Instead, "spin" is put on everything Outright lies and felonies against the American people are treated as minor public relations problems to be dealt with and smoothed over. And the few that are honest have to fight tooth and nail to stay that way because of all the temptations. Life is crazy I guess. Sep 16, Brian Schwartz rated it really liked it Shelves: One wonders how much is entirely accurate because the men who gave their accounts knew they were framing their own places in history.

Nixon would tell his story several years later.

Letting go

That Bob Woodward hates Richard Nixon is undisputed. The story then goes on to quote the Nixon tapes darkest moments. Nixon was foolish to tape himself. But how many of us would want to be defined by our darkest thoughts uttered? Bob Woodward works hard to assure that Nixon is defined in just that way. Historian Stephen Ambrose sees Nixon much differently. Ambrose was not a Nixon supporter, having never voted for him.

His war on cancer, his efforts on behalf of workers and the environment, and his great international achievements. None of those things mean as much to Bob Woodward as his own aggrandizement. Ambrose was a scholar. Woodward is a reporter. Jul 12, Kerissa Ward rated it liked it Recommends it for: Watergate Historians and Students. I finally finished this book over the Christmas holidays. Maybe it was because I knew how the story ended Nixon resigning that I dawdled so long in reading it. Somehow I was able to finish. I'd say, compared to 'All The President's Men', the book is much slower.

There is a lot of detail, too. The book finally came alive when Henry Kissinger entered the story and the reader gets so I finally finished this book over the Christmas holidays.

Michael Jackson: The Final Days (2014)

The book finally came alive when Henry Kissinger entered the story and the reader gets some juicy gossip about Nixon and Kissinger's working relationship. By the end, it was very clear that Nixon knew more than he was admitting, but also that he was in absolute denial of the illegality of his actions. I knew when I finished that I needed to also read the accounts by Haldeman, Erlichman and Dean to continuing getting a better picture of the situation. I also order 'Watergate' by Fred Emery to learn more about what led up to the break-in. I would recommend the book, but only to people who enjoy the intrigue of Watergate.

Given how quickly this book was published after the Nixon presidency, it is remarkably well researched and detailed. The content is chilling: My only quibble with the book is that it is so focused on the internal workings of the West Wing and First Family that reading this many decades later it is hard to put the events in the con Given how quickly this book was published after the Nixon presidency, it is remarkably well researched and detailed. My only quibble with the book is that it is so focused on the internal workings of the West Wing and First Family that reading this many decades later it is hard to put the events in the context of national and world events.

Feb 18, Susan Stonesifer rated it it was amazing. Having lived through this time in Washington, DC it is still amazing to read of the actions of Nixon and others. They definitely define hubris. I listened to All the President's Men this summer and am so glad I followed it up with this.


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  5. That bastard should have gone to jail. Jun 22, Donna rated it it was amazing Shelves: Seemed like a good time to read this. Feb 08, Jane rated it really liked it. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Olson turns her razor sharp vision on the Clintons' shocking excesses in their final days of office: Hardcover , pages. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Final Days , please sign up. Lists with This Book.

    This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Mar 18, Marcie rated it it was ok. I was hoping for a well-researched, well-documented, well-written, even treatment of the Evil Regime, perfect for an agenda-less Joe Schmoe like myself -- this ain't it, though. I was intrigued frankly by the fact the author perished on the hijacked plane that went into the Pentagon. But, boy, did it bring back the swell memories. How could I have forgotten the Arkansas state troopers whose job it was to round up women for the Big Guy? Or the fact that we had as our Commander in Chief a draft-dod I was hoping for a well-researched, well-documented, well-written, even treatment of the Evil Regime, perfect for an agenda-less Joe Schmoe like myself -- this ain't it, though.

    Or the fact that we had as our Commander in Chief a draft-dodger who didn't inhale or quite grasp the meaning of "is"? Or Paula Jones or the Flowers chick or the weird "non" impeachment? So, it all came rushing back to me I had not forgotten Travelgate and Whitewater and Monica, though. Wow, it was a busy 8 years for the Clintons!

    I'm laughing so hard I can't contain myself -- not. How did they find the time between all the gifting and looting of the White House? They had a lot of debt to pay off and future New York votes to buy. These people are classless and shameless. It's not possible to write of the Clintons and be even-handed. Hillary arouses such fear and hatred in me as I can clearly see the twisted evil in her. Just by the sheer will of her personality alone she stares down accusers until they flinch, she makes wrong-doing seem okay. I am most upset by my own acceptance of corruption, greed, and force as "politics as usual.

    It's all so depressing. Quick, give me a book to read so I can escape from this reality. Sep 20, Dani marked it as to-read. Finished just before she died. Her family had it published anyway. Feb 01, Atchisson rated it really liked it. The pardons, the vandalism, the pilfering. It really was more like Animal House than the White House.

    She was on one of the ill-fated planes and still had the presence of mind to call the authorities to alert them. I always wonder about the many books she'd have written by now. This, though, is a fitting testament to her skill and passion. Feb 15, Jerry Landry rated it liked it Shelves: While Olson brings up some interesting points about the end of the Clinton presidency, her arguments are diminished by partisan vitriol, as she constantly sought a place to put another jab in.

    Also, in some places, I wish she would have provided better citations as to where quotes or statements presented as facts came from. Had Olson presented the same information in a more scholarly fashion and less sensationalistic, I think it would have served her arguments much better. Jul 08, Amanda rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Very interesting book regarding President Clintons pardons, especially in light of the Scooter Libby pardon.

    Scooter really didn't seem to do anything. Clinton pardon murders, crooks and terrorist. May 21, Anna rated it it was amazing.